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The Lompoc Vision

“Good News You Can Use.”

6

EMERGENCY SERVICES

Adult Protective Services (APS) -

To report suspected el-

der or dependent adult abuse, staff is available from 8 a.m.

to 5 p.m. After 5 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.) and during the weekend,

a recording will offer instructions on what to do. APS in-

vestigates reports of suspected dependent adult abuse (18-

64) and elder abuse (65+), including self-neglect, occuring

in the community.

www.countyofsb.org

.................................

1-844-751-6729

Department of Social Services, Santa Barbara County

General relief, food stamps & Medi-Cal.

1100 WLaurel Ave. ....................................

(805) 737-7080

Domestic Violence Solutions -

Offers temporary shelter to

battered women and their children, victims of sexual as-

sault and other trauma.

24-hour Hotline .........................................

(804) 736-0965

Friendship Line -

Calls are connected to a skilled, trained

counselor, anytime 24/7. This crisis intervention and “warm

line” offers emotional support to seniors and abled adults.

.....................................................................(

800) 971-0016

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline -

Calls are connect-

ed to a skilled, trained counselor, anytime 24/7.

........................................................

800-273-TALK (8255)

Family Services Agency -

Provides individual counseling

services on a sliding scale fee basis.

101 South B Street .....................................

(805) 735-4376

CIVIC/COMMUNITY/CONSUMER

National Association of Retired Federal Employees,

District IX -

Monthly meetings are held. Advisors and ad-

vocates on behalf of retired federal employees on issues

relating to retirement and other public benefits.

.......................................................

.lompocski@gmail.com

EDUCATION

Adult School, Lompoc -

Lompoc Adult School offers

programs which include basic education, high school pro-

grams, vocational and occupational training and English as

a Second Language (ESL).

The school has a GED center which provides a high

school diploma. They also offer “traffic school” and pro-

vide “behindthe-wheel” driver training.

320 North “J” Street, Lompoc. ...................

(805) 742-3100

Adult Education Programs -

These programs offer many

courses of interest to seniors. Some classes are free; others

have fees. The selection o course is extensive.

320 N J Street, Lompoc. .............................

(805) 742-3100

Allan Hancock College Community Education -

One

Hancock Drive, Lompoc, ...........................

(805) 735-3366

641 Utah Ave., Bldg.13640, Rm. 216

Vandenberg AFB, .......................................

(805) 734-3500

Alzheimer’s Association

- Provides community education

programs for caregivers and people with early stage Al-

zheimer’s disease. Provides respite care and consultation.

www.alz.org/cacentral.

..............................

(800) 272-3900

ELDER ABUSE & CRIME

Adult Protective Services Hotline -

An investigation into

the suspected abuse may be initiated based upon the infor-

mation that you are able to provide. You may, if you choose,

report anonymously or call to discuss your concerns with-

out making a report. Elder-care custodians, health practi-

tioners, or employees of any agency/ business who, within

their professional capacity or within the scope of the em-

ployment, have a reasonable suspicion of abuse, MUST

REPORT immediately by telephone and in writing within

two working days to Adult Protective Services. Long-Term

Care Ombudsman Services, or to law enforcement.

Online:

www.ReportToAPS.org

. ..............

1-844-751-6729

COUNTY PROGRAMS

Department of Social Services Santa Barbara County -

1100 W. Laurel Ave., Lompoc. ..................

(805) 737-7080

I

n the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease, families face new questions as

they adjust. What does the di-

agnosis mean? What kinds of

plans need to be made? What re-

sources are available to help? Join

us for this 3-part series to hear

practical answers to the questions that arise in the early stage. Hear from those

directly affected and learn what you can do to cope with the changes that come

with an early-stage diagnosis.

More than 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with Al-

zheimer’s or other dementias. In 2016, caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s

or other dementias provided an estimated 18.2 billion hours of unpaid assis-

tance, a contribution to the nation valued at $230.1 billion. The care provided

to people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is wide-ranging and,

in some instances, all-encompassing. Caregivers for people with dementia

tend to provide more extensive assistance and experience more difficulty than

caregivers of individuals without dementia.

Approximately one quarter of dementia caregivers are “sandwich genera-

tion” caregivers, meaning they care not only for an aging parent, but also for

children under age 18.

Moreover, new data shows that caregivers for Alzheimer’s and dementia may

experience increased difficulties and detriments to their health than caregivers

for individuals with certain other conditions.

To address these issues, the Alzheimer’s Association in partnership with

the Lompoc Valley Medical Center Family Caregiver Support Network will

provide free 3-part educational workshop.

March 11: Part 2 - Approaches to Treatment, Health Care Team, Family and Friends

The second of a 3-part series of workshops helps families understand dementia