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The Lompoc Vision

“Good News You Can Use.”

5

EMERGENCY SERVICES

Adult Protective Services (APS) -

To report suspected el-

der or dependent adult abuse, staff is available from 8 a.m.

to 5 p.m. After 5 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.) and during the weekend,

a recording will offer instructions on what to do. APS in-

vestigates reports of suspected dependent adult abuse (18-

64) and elder abuse (65+), including self-neglect, occuring

in the community.

www.countyofsb.org

.................................

1-844-751-6729

Department of Social Services, Santa Barbara County

General relief, food stamps & Medi-Cal.

1100 WLaurel Ave. ....................................

(805) 737-7080

Domestic Violence Solutions -

Offers temporary shelter to

battered women and their children, victims of sexual as-

sault and other trauma.

24-hour Hotline .........................................

(804) 736-0965

Friendship Line -

Calls are connected to a skilled, trained

counselor, anytime 24/7. This crisis intervention and “warm

line” offers emotional support to seniors and abled adults.

.....................................................................(

800) 971-0016

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline -

Calls are connect-

ed to a skilled, trained counselor, anytime 24/7.

........................................................

800-273-TALK (8255)

Family Services Agency -

Provides individual counseling

services on a sliding scale fee basis.

101 South B Street .....................................

(805) 735-4376

CIVIC/COMMUNITY/CONSUMER

National Association of Retired Federal Employees,

District IX -

Monthly meetings are held. Advisors and ad-

vocates on behalf of retired federal employees on issues

relating to retirement and other public benefits.

.......................................................

.lompocski@gmail.com

EDUCATION

Adult Education Programs -

These programs offer many

courses of interest to seniors. Some classes are free; others

have fees. The selection o course is extensive.

Allan Hancock College Community Education -

One

Hancock Drive, Lompoc, ...........................

(805) 735-3366

641 Utah Ave., Bldg.13640, Rm. 216

Vandenberg AFB, .......................................

(805) 734-3500

Adult School, Lompoc -

Lompoc Adult School offers

programs which include basic education, high school pro-

grams, vocational and occupational training and English as

a Second Language (ESL).

The school has a GED center which provides a high

school diploma. They also offer “traffic school” and pro-

vide “behindthe-wheel” driver training.

320 North “J” Street, Lompoc. ...................

(805) 742-3100

Sansum Clinic,

Education Department -

Offers a wide va-

riety of health education programs, from Asthma to weight

management, including comprehensive diabetes education.

All are open to the community. Most are free of charge,

some with a materials fee. Call or visit online for offerings

and schedule:

www.SansumClinic.org/classes.

1225 North H Street, Lompoc. .... Toll Free

(866) 829-0909

ELDER ABUSE & CRIME

Adult Protective Services Hotline -

An investigation into

the suspected abuse may be initiated based upon the infor-

mation that you are able to provide. You may, if you choose,

report anonymously or call to discuss your concerns with-

Active & Engaged

H

ealth professionals have long recognized that maintaining healthy social contacts has a direct influence on our general health and well-being. It’s

easy enough to do when one works full-time and/or is busy keeping up with the family, but time changes that. Kids go off to college, we retire,

and, sometimes, we lose our driving privilege, which in turn limits our ability to remain socially active, among other things. The dynamic interac-

tions that were, relatively speaking, effortless, now take intentional effort, but we cannot lose sight of the importance of that effort. According to AARP’s,

Framework for Isolation in Adults Over 50, playing an active role in society throughout

our lives is crucial to our health. We need the stimulation that friendships and work (as

a volunteer, in paid employment, or as part of a community group) provide.

Without it, we increase the risk of losing our social skills and becoming isolated,

which has a direct effect on our health and well-being. Social isolation has been linked

to poor health, lack of strength and energy, loneliness, depression, and other physical,

emotional and mental health problems. As the Executive Director for Community Part-

ners in Caring, my focus is on helping to create services and programs that help seniors age in place while maintaining

quality of life. Doing something about the effects of social isolation is weaved into the fabric of our organization. It has

to be. Of the two hundred and thirty seniors served last year, ninety-one live alone. That’s almost 40% of the people

we serve. This is a small sample of the population in our community, but it isn’t unique to the seniors we serve. In the

2007 Health and Retirement Study on loneliness among adults aged fifty and older, Lauri Theeke found that “isolation

is a social problem that impacts as many as 17% of older Americans.” She and her colleagues also found that “chronic

loneliness was associated with higher numbers of chronic illness and higher depression scores, among other health-

related issues.” Clearly, staying active and engaged during retirement is critical to our overall well-being. It’s not just

a matter of ensuring our finances and health coverage is in order, we must also give thought to how we plan to stay

socially active. Having said that, we all know that sometimes even the best laid plans go awry.

What to do then? Senior social clubs are a great option and, thankfully, there are several non-profits in the area, including Community Partners in Caring, that could use your help

and experience. Find a non-profit that speaks to you and give them a call. In terms of Community Partners in Caring, we simply cannot make a difference in the life of an older senior

without our volunteers. For some of our homebound seniors, they are literally life savers. They engage older seniors, as well as homebound seniors, in conversation while removing

barriers to participation in society. One of those barriers is transportation. Our volunteer drivers provide door-through-door transportation to medical appointments, the grocery store,

and other health/wellness activities. They bring light and laughter into someone’s life, which, on a personal note, is something I would want for myself if I was in my late 80’s living

alone. It’s important meaningful work and we could use your help. An hour or two per month, based on your availability, can help bring some light into someone’s life and it may just

bring some into yours. Our volunteer drivers are provided with mileage reimbursement, enjoy privacy, can view volunteer opportunities from any electronic device, and choose when

and who to help. We celebrate them by hosting social events/gatherings: The Annual Volunteer Christmas party, Quarterly Roundtables, and our Annual BBQ. I may be a little biased,

but I feel Community Partners in Caring is the best place to volunteer while remaining active and engaged. Join us! (805) 925-0125.

By Vilma P. Contreras / Executive Director, Community Partners in Caring